Ethology, Neurophysiology, Neuropharmacology, Sex Differences, and Effects of Stress on the Defensive Burying Paradigm: A Review

Authors

  • Maya Koblanski University of British Columbia
  • Tristan Philippe University of British Columbia, University of Ottawa

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51390/vajbts.v1i1.21

Abstract

The defensive burying paradigm can inform how stressor controllability affects stress adaptation, which has clinical implications with regards to adaptive coping responses following presentation with a stressful situation. Active coping (notably defensive burying) is associated with a controllable stressor, promoting stress adaptation, thus decreases stress hormone levels. In opposition, chronic stress and uncontrollable stressors lead to an increase in passive coping behaviours, with elevated stress hormone levels. Several brain regions have been implicated in active and passive coping, as well as neurotransmitter systems, which can be evaluated via pharmacological manipulation. No sex differences were found in defensive burying, although there were effects of sex hormones within sex.

Author Biography

Tristan Philippe, University of British Columbia, University of Ottawa

PhD Candidate (Neuroscience), Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Coumbia. MSc. & Honours BSc. at University of Ottawa.

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Published

2021-07-07

How to Cite

Koblanski, M., & Philippe, T. (2021). Ethology, Neurophysiology, Neuropharmacology, Sex Differences, and Effects of Stress on the Defensive Burying Paradigm: A Review. Virginia Journal of Business, Technology, and Science, 1(1). https://doi.org/10.51390/vajbts.v1i1.21